Archive for ‘Weather’

September 7, 2011

Global Temperature Trends

by Vince

More on the above chart here.

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September 6, 2011

One Other Sign of How Our War(s) Hurt Us

by Vince

In Vermont, they had to receive special out of state air support during Hurricane Irene because their helicopters were being used for war purposes in Iraq.

September 6, 2011

Political Cartoon of the Day II

by Vince

September 6, 2011

Stars and Storms

by Vince


Tempest Milky Way from Randy Halverson on Vimeo.

August 30, 2011

Judging Hurricane Irene and Our Hurricane-type Hysteria, Ctd.

by Vince

Two more posts came across my desk here and here that are worth reading regarding this subject.

August 30, 2011

Irene in NYC

by Vince
August 30, 2011

Judging Hurricane Irene and Our Hurricane-type Hysteria

by Vince

If you live on the east coast in the U.S., you most likely have heard about Hurricane Irene non-stop for the past week (at least). A few of the places you may have heard bits of news from would of been the Weather Channel (as well as other local or national news stations) as well as Facebook (as well as the World Wide Web). Both of these media outlets covered this hurricane quite extensively. The former was done by professionals while the latter was done by mostly normal joe’s. What both have in common is that they stirred up interesting reactions in all of us.

T.V., especially weather coverage, can go over board. The constant reporting and sometimes worst-case scenarios may really freak people out to the point of hysteria. Facebook seemed to have had similar effects. One friend of mine noticed an interesting trend that isn’t necessarily unique to Hurricane Irene but still interesting: while many people freaked out about Hurricane Irene, many people freaked out about people freaking out about Hurricane Irene. If you think about it, this irony surely does play out in many situations. I don’t have T.V. so I somewhat tried to avoid Facebook so that I could sit back and watch the rain come down and relax over a shut-in type weekend.

One final note: politics has to come into play somehow with this hurricane and the hysteria (doesn’t it?) Two pieces worth checking out: Rush Limbaugh’s usual comments regarding the hysteria:

It was a rainstorm and there was a lot of flooding and there were deaths associated with it,” Limbaugh said. “But they hype — folks, I’ll tell you what this was, was a lesson.

“If you pay any attention to this, they hype — the desire for chaos, I mean, literally — the media desire for chaos was a great learning tool. This is a great illustration of how all of the rest of the media in news, in sports, has templates and narratives and exaggerates beyond reality creating fear, so as to create interest.”

With at least 40 people dead (and rising) and millions in damage, the king of hype and hysteria has to chime in, doesn’t he? However, I partly am in agreement with Rush. Some members of the media, and I include Facebook in this, have a tendency to almost want drama, hype, and buckets of craziness, in not only national events but their own lives.

Second, Ezra Klein et al wonder if we didn’t hype the storm enough considering what it was capable of:

A lot of the commentary over whether the storm got too much attention has been based around the damage the storm did or did not do. NBC’s Al Roker, for instance, tweeted, “Since when is covering a storm that kills 16 people and counting, causes massive flooding and millions in damage hype?” Over at the New York Times, Nate Silver runs somenumbers and concludes that Irenes ranks as “the 8th-most destructive storm since 1980, adjusted for inflation and the growth in wealth and population.”

But the Irene hype occurred mostly before it made landfall, and so mostly before we knew how bad it really was, or wasn’t. Storms are unpredictable, both in their path and intensity, and though Irene mostly broke our way, it could easily have swung towards New York City and picked up speed before smacking into the city. If that had happened, we would be having a very different conversation right now. So the question isn’t whether the storm was overhyped given how things actually went, but whether it was overhyped given how they could have gone. I’m not enough of a meteorologist to render a verdict on that, but it’s the right question to be asking.

August 30, 2011

Political Cartoon of the Day

by Vince

August 29, 2011

Quote of the Day II: God Punished America with Hurricane Irene

by Vince


“I don’t know how much God has to do to get the attention of the politicians. We’ve had an earthquake; we’ve had a hurricane. He said, ‘Are you going to start listening to me here?’ Listen to the American people because the American people are roaring right now. They know government is on a morbid obesity diet and we’ve got to rein in the spending.” –Michele Bachmann on how she interpreted Hurricane Irene this past weekend.

Doug Mataconis adds some insight:

Of course, I’m not sure how this computes given the fact that the storm largely spared Washington, D.C. and New York, while hammering a red states like North Carolina and a heavily Republican area like Virginia’s Tidewater region.

Bachmann’s press secretary adds some extremely deep insight:

”Obviously she was saying it in jest.”

August 27, 2011

Get the Hell of the Beach Quote of the Day

by Vince

“Get the hell off the Beach in Asbury Park and get out. You’re done. It’s 4:30 PM. You’ve maximized your tan. Get off the beach. Get in you cars and get out of those areas.” – New Jersey Governor Chris Christie in prepping his state for Hurricane Irene.

August 21, 2011

Political Cartoon of the Day

by Vince

June 12, 2011

Stay Cool

by Vince
June 11, 2011

Fly Away to Venice Beach

by Vince

With all of the successive heat warning days in the mid to upper 90’s this past week, I share this video.

May 27, 2011

Picture of the Day

by Vince

Pictured: The path of a powerful tornado is seen in Joplin, Missouri, Tuesday, May 24, 2011. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

May 27, 2011

Tornado Watch

by Vince

I woke up this morning feeling really thankful that I still had a roof over my head. We lost power last night for four hours due to a severe storm sweeping through central Pennsylvania. A few trees came down and I heard a house got struck by lightning nearby. I turned the radio on this morning and heard of the continued destruction across the Midwest and South and now floods in Vermont.

Again, I’m very thankful. I haven’t lost power for that long of a time in a few years. I’m just not use to mother nature going haywire in my area. Pennsylvania seems to be mostly a lucky place in that it misses tornado’s and major storms.

My thoughts and prayers are out for those hurting across the U.S.A.

May 25, 2011

Plastic UPS Trucks

by Vince

They are testing them out:

UPS has more than 70,000 vehicles on the road, so gains in fuel efficiency can save the company a lot of money—and reduce carbon emissions for the rest of us. Their latest experiment is a prototype CV-23 truck, which has body panels made of ABS plastic instead of sheet aluminum. That means it’s about 1,000 lbs lighter than a standard truck and can run on a smaller engine. The upshot? It’s 40 percent more fuel efficient. The folks at Triple Pundit estimate it gets more than 14 miles per gallon, which might not sound like a lot, but could save around 84 million gallons of fuel annually.

UPS will be testing five of these plastic CV-23s, made by Utilimaster and Isuzu, through December 2011, on some of the company’s most bruising, high-mile routes. They’ll deal with rough rural roads in Lincoln, Nebraska; freezing temperatures in Albany, New York; and the heat of the Tucson, Arizona desert. If they survive, they’ll be incorporated into UPS’s permanent fleet.

And good news: ABS plastic can, in theory at least, be recovered and reused when the trucks have been retired.

You just hope the trucks don’t melt in Arizona. It will be interesting to see how they react to different types of weather.

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March 27, 2011

Snowmotion

by Vince
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March 23, 2011

The Most Expensive Disasters

by Vince

The Economist explains:

JAPAN is still reeling from the earthquake and tsunami that struck its north-east coast on March 11th, with the government struggling to contain a nuclear disaster and around 10,000 people still unaccounted for. Provisional  estimates released today by the World Bank put the economic damage resulting from the disaster at as much as $235 billion, around 4% of GDP. That figure would make this disaster the costliest since comparable records began in 1965. The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004, which caused some 250,000 deaths, does not feature on this chart. Economic losses there amounted to only $14 billion in today’s prices, partly because of low property and land values in the affected areas.

H/T: Andrew Sullivan

March 11, 2011

Pacific Tsunami In Perspective

by Vince

The above image captures the amplitude of the Tsunami over the last 24 hours. More can be found here.

February 19, 2011

Snow!

by Vince

Above is a mash-up of people seeing snow for the first time.

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